Friday, 11 January 2013

CONCEPT V


Short form:

Throughout our structure, a traditional "Right of Appeal" ought to prevail, so that minority opinion will be heard and personal grievances receive careful consideration.

Long form:

Throughout our world services structure, a traditional "Right of Appeal" ought to prevail, thus assuring us that minority opinion will be heard and that petitions for the redress of personal grievances will be carefully considered.

Questions in service

·         At group or Intergroup level, etc., is the expression of minority opinion encouraged?
·         At group or Intergroup level, etc., are petitions for the redress of personal grievances heard?

Questions in life

·         Do I respect the right of the minority to disagree and express that disagreement?
·         When I am in a majority, do I encourage minority opinion to be expressed?
·         Do I consider that the minority may sometimes be right?
·         Do I actually listen with an open mind?
·         Do I continue to exercise patience, tolerance, kindness, and love with people who disagree?
·         When I am in a minority, do I exercise my right of appeal and petition?
·         Do I collude or collaborate in what I believe wrong for fear of the majority's reaction?
·         Do I judge what is right and wrong by what the majority believe and do?
·         When overwhelmed by my own addictions, character defects, or circumstances, do I appeal and petition to the higher authority of God?

Quotations

'In the light of the principle of the "Right of Appeal," all minorities—whether in our staffs, committees, corporate boards, or among the Trustees—should be encouraged to file minority reports whenever they feel a majority to be in considerable error. And when a minority considers an issue to be such a grave one that a mistaken decision could seriously affect AA as a whole, it should then charge itself with the actual duty of presenting a minority report to the Conference.

In granting this traditional "Right of Appeal,," we recognize that minorities frequently can be right; that even when they are partly or wholly in error they still perform a most valuable service when, by asserting their "Right of Appeal," they compel a thoroughgoing debate on important issues. The well-heard minority, therefore, is our chief protection against an uninformed, misinformed, hasty or angry majority.


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